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Meeting With NIH Distinguished Scholars

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Francis Collins meets with NIH distinguished scholars

The NIH will soon launch its Distinguished Scholars Program to enhance diversity among tenure track investigators in the Intramural Research Program. On October 1, 2018, I joined Michael Gottesman (back row, second left) and Hannah Valentine (back row middle, standing next to me), NIH’s chief officer for Scientific Workforce Diversity, and other NIH leaders and mentors in meeting with the first group of 13 distinguished scholars after work at a Bethesda, MD restaurant. It was my pleasure to talk about the pursuit of excellence at NIH and in science in general. Credit: NIH


Celebrating Our Nation’s Birth and What It Means for All of Us

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Happy Fourth of July! It’s the perfect time to fire up the grill, go watch some fireworks, and pay tribute to the vision of all who founded the United States of America. The Fourth of July also stands as a reminder of the many new opportunities that our nation and its people continue to pursue. One of the most exciting is NIH’s All of Us Research Program, which is on the way to enrolling 1 million or more Americans from all walks of life to create a resource that will accelerate biomedical breakthroughs and transform medicine.

What exactly do I mean by “transform?” Today, most medical care is “one-size-fits-all,” not tailored to the unique needs of each individual. In order to change that situation and realize the full promise of precision medicine, researchers need a lot more information about individual differences in lifestyle, environment, and biology. To help move precision medicine research forward, our nation needs people like you to come together through the All of Us program to share information about your health, habits, and what it’s like where you live. All of your information will be protected by clear privacy and security principles.

All of Us welcomes people from across our diverse land. Enrollment in the research program is open to all, and anyone over the age of 18 who is living in the United States can join. Since full enrollment began in May, three of every four volunteers have come from groups traditionally underrepresented in biomedical research. These include people from a multitude of races and ethnicities, as well as folks with disabilities and those who live in remote or rural communities.

So, as you celebrate the birth of the United States this Independence Day, I ask you also to look ahead to our nation’s future and what you can do to make it brighter. One way you can do that is to consider joining me and thousands of other Americans who’ve already signed up for All of Us. Together, we can build a resource that will revolutionize medicine for generations to come. Thanks, and have a safe and glorious Fourth of July!

Links:

Join All of Us

All of Us (NIH)

Video: What is All of Us?

Video: All of Us: Importance of Diversity

Video: All of Us Launch

I Handed Over My Genetic Data to the NIH. Here’s Why You Should, Too (STAT)

NIH Support: NIH Office of the Director


All of Us: We are Bay Area’s Hispanic Community

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All of Us: We are Chicago’s Asian American Community

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All of Us: Importance of Diversity

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Medical research hasn’t always fully represented our nation’s rich diversity. As the video above shows, NIH’s All of Us Research Program is committed to doing things differently by enrolling individuals of many different races, ethnicities, and walks of life. The more we know about what makes each person unique, the more customized health care can become.

Want to be part of this pioneering effort? Go to the All of Us website, click the “Join Now” button, and follow the three easy steps. First, create an account. It’s free and takes just a minute or two. Next, complete the enrollment and consent forms. That usually takes 30 minutes or less. Then, complete some baseline surveys and find out what to do next. Thank you!


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