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STEM

Serenading the Scientists of Tomorrow

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Dr. Francis Collins performs a song on stage at the AJAS Breakfast with Scientists
I brought along my guitar to help welcome American Junior Academy of Science (AJAS) delegates to Washington, D.C., on February 19, 2019. AJAS is an honor society that encourages high school students to pursue STEM careers. Credit: Lee Ann Brogie

Talking with Middle School Students in Wisconsin

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I live-streamed recently with a sharp group of science students at the Johnson Creek Middle School, Johnson Creek WI. The topic of our conversation was how to pursue a career in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)? Among the questions that the students posed: What inspired you to become a scientist? What are roadblocks and how do you to overcome them? Here are my answers as well as our full conversation, which took place on December 10, 2018.


A Group Photo with HiSTEP Students

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Francis Collins and HiSTEP students

These terrific students are part of the NIH High School Scientific Training and Enrichment Program (HiSTEP), which encourages careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medically related fields). HiSTEP students take part in a seven-week summer internship on the NIH campus. I had the pleasure of meeting with them on August 1, 2018. Credit: NIH


Cool Videos: Insulin from Bacteria to You

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If you have a smartphone, you’ve probably used it to record a video or two. But could you use it to produce a video that explains a complex scientific topic in 2 minutes or less? That was the challenge posed by the RCSB Protein Data Bank last spring to high school students across the nation. And the winning result is the video that you see above!

This year’s contest, which asked students to provide a molecular view of diabetes treatment and management, attracted 53 submissions from schools from coast to coast. The winning team—Andrew Ma, George Song, and Anirudh Srikanth—created their video as their final project for their advanced placement (AP) biology class at West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South, Princeton Junction, NJ.