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translational research

2018 Collins Scholars

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Francis Collins poses with awardees at Francis Collins Scholars Scientific Symposium

Here are the 2018 Collins Scholars: Ina Ly (left), Massachusetts General Hospital and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston; and Shruti Garg, (right), Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, United Kingdom. These young physician-scientists will receive three years of support and training through the Francis S. Collins Scholars Program in Neurofibromatosis Clinical and Translational Research. The program, now in its fifth year, is helping to create a community of outstanding clinician-scientists with expertise in research and clinical care for neurofibromatosis type I. The photo was taken at the Francis Collins Scholars Orientation Day, held at Rock Creek Mansion in Bethesda, MD on August 3, 2018. Credit: Lizzy Lees Photos


Clinical Trials: Sharing of Data and Living Up to Our End of the Bargain

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Discussing clinical trials

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Today we took a huge step forward in our efforts to make sure that data from biomedical research is shared widely and rapidly. The NIH, in collaboration with our fine colleagues at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and with the valuable input from scientists, patients and other members of the public, has announced the HHS regulation and NIH policy to ensure that information about clinical trials is widely shared. In this blog I want to talk about what this will mean for patients, providers, and researchers. I also want to reflect a bit on how the new regulation and policy fit into our overall efforts to improve clinical trials and data sharing.

Clinical trials are essential for the translation of research advances to new approaches to prevention and treatment. Volunteers who take part in clinical trials often do so with no assurance of personal benefit, but with the expectation that their involvement will add to the growing body of knowledge about health and disease, and thus may help others someday. For that to be realized, all trial results information needs to be publicly reported in a timely fashion—and yet we know that doesn’t always happen. Today’s announcements aim to change that. The HHS regulation issued today, called a “final rule”, describes requirements for registering certain clinical trials and submitting summary results information from these trials to ClinicalTrials.gov, a database managed by NIH’s National Library of Medicine (NLM).


Cool Videos: Rapping for Research

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CTSAs Video ScreenshotMany entries in the NIH Common Fund video competition highlight particular research projects. But in the original rap video that I’m featuring today, a group of New York researchers deliver a message about the central importance of collaboration for moving scientific breakthroughs from the bench to the bedside.

Or, as the researchers themselves put it, “This video describes, in rap, the Weill Cornell Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC), a partnership of world-class academic institutions and health centers in New York City. The CTSC supports the translation of basic science research into better patient care that will improve our nation’s health. It fosters high-risk/high-reward research, enabling the development of transformative tools and methodologies, and filling fundamental knowledge gaps. The CTSC seeks to change academic culture to foster collaboration and was made possible by a Clinical and Translational Science Award from the NIH Common Fund, administered by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS).”

Links:

Weill Cornell Clinical and Translational Science Center

Clinical and Translational Science Awards (NCATS)

NIH Common Fund Video Competition

NIH support: Common Fund; National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences


Cool Videos: Heart Attack

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Blood Clots Video screenshot

Up next in our scientific film fest is an original music video, straight from the Big Apple. Created by researchers at The Rockefeller University, this song-and-dance routine provides an entertaining—and informative—look at how blood clots form, their role in causing heart attacks, and what approaches are being tried to break up these clots.

Before (or after!) you hit “play,” it might help to take a few moments to review the scientists’ description of their efforts: the key to saving the lives of heart attack victims lies in the molecules that control how blood vessels become clogged. This molecular biomedicine music video explains how ischemic injury can be prevented shortly after heart attack symptoms begin: clot blocking. The science is the collaborative work of Dr. Barry Coller of Rockefeller, Dr. Craig Thomas and his colleagues at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), and Dr. Marta Filizola and her Mount Sinai colleagues.

Links:

Laboratory of Blood and Vascular Biology, The Rockefeller University

Filizola Laboratory, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Center for Clinical and Translational Science, The Rockefeller University

Clinical and Translational Science Awards (NCATS/NIH)

NIH Common Fund Video Competition

NIH support: Common Fund; National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences


Cool Videos: Diving for Drugs

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Therapies From the Sea video sceenshot

Who says biomedical scientists always have to work indoors? The next installment in our mini-film fest proves otherwise, offering a close-up look at some medicinal chemists who are busy carrying out their research in warm waters off the Florida Keys.

This aquatic adventure may not be as action-packed as “Pirates of the Caribbean” or “Finding Nemo.” But these researchers from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy in Gainesville are out to discover something far more valuable to patients than sunken treasure: marine life with chemical compounds that may provide the basis for new treatments and cures.


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