NIH Family Members Giving Back: Rebecca Shlafer

Rebecca Shlafer

Rebecca Shlafer/Credit: Brady Willette

When Rebecca Shlafer clicks on her office lights each morning at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, she usually has a good idea of what to expect from the day ahead as lead of a nine-person research team that studies the effects of incarceration on children and families. It’s her volunteer work that can be unpredictable.

For the past eight years, this developmental child psychologist has donated her free time to serve as a guardian ad litem for abused or neglected children who’ve been removed from their homes and placed under protective supervision of Minnesota’s Fourth Judicial District. In that volunteer capacity, Shlafer advocates in court for the well-being of the child, but doesn’t foster the youngster or provide any day-to-day care.

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Sound Advice: High School Music Training Sharpens Language Skills

Band InstrumentsWhen children enter the first grade, their brains are primed for learning experiences, significantly more so, in fact, than adult brains. For instance, scientists have documented that musical training during grade school produces a signature set of benefits for the brain and for behavior—benefits that can last a lifetime, whether or not people continue to play music.

Now, researchers at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, have some good news for teenagers who missed out on learning to play musical instruments as young kids. Even when musical training isn’t started until high school, it produces meaningful changes in how the brain processes sound. And those changes have positive benefits not only for a teen’s musical abilities, but also for skills related to reading and writing.

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Team Approach Helps Teen Depression

Team of Support

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As many as one in five U.S. teenagers experience an episode of major depression by the time they turn 18. Sadly, depression among teens often goes unrecognized, increasing the risk of suicide, substance abuse, and many other problems. Even among those who are diagnosed, few receive proper treatment. But now there’s a ray of hope from a new NIH-funded study that’s found success using a team approach that pairs depressed teens and their parents with a counselor [1].

Faced with a shortage of psychiatrists who specialize in child mental health, a multidisciplinary team from the Seattle Children’s Research Institute, University of Washington School of Medicine, and Group Health in Seattle decided to use a strategy called “collaborative care” to treat depressed teenagers. There are more than 70 clinical trials showing that team-based care approaches work well for adults with depression, but there were only two such previous studies in teens—and results were mixed.

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