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Does Gastric Bypass Reduce Cardiovascular Complications of Diabetes?

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For obese people with diabetes, doctors have increasingly been offering gastric bypass surgery as a way to lose weight and control blood glucose levels. Short-term results are often impressive, but questions have remained about the long-term benefits of such operations. Now, a large, international study has some answers.

Soon after gastric bypass surgery, about 50 percent of folks not only lost weight but they also showed well-controlled blood glucose, cholesterol, and blood pressure. The good news is that five years later about half of those who originally showed those broad benefits of surgery maintained that healthy profile. The not-so-good news is that the other half, while they generally continued to sustain weight loss and better glucose control, began to show signs of increasing risk for cardiovascular complications.


Tumor Scanner Promises Fast 3D Imaging of Biopsies

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UW light sheet microscope team

Caption: University of Washington team that developed new light-sheet microscope (center) includes (l-r) Jonathan Liu, Adam Glaser, Larry True, Nicholas Reder, and Ye Chen.
Credit: Mark Stone/University of Washington

After surgically removing a tumor from a cancer patient, doctors like to send off some of the tissue for evaluation by a pathologist to get a better idea of whether the margins are cancer free and to guide further treatment decisions. But for technical reasons, completing the pathology report can take days, much to the frustration of patients and their families. Sometimes the results even require an additional surgical procedure.

Now, NIH-funded researchers have developed a groundbreaking new microscope to help perform the pathology in minutes, not days. How’s that possible? The device works like a scanner for tissues, using a thin sheet of light to capture a series of thin cross sections within a tumor specimen without having to section it with a knife, as is done with conventional pathology. The rapidly acquired 2D “optical sections” are processed by a computer that assembles them into a high-resolution 3D image for immediate analysis.


Weighing Surgical Options for Breast Cancer

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An increasing number of women with cancer in one breast are choosing to have both breasts surgically removed in hopes of reducing the chance of developing cancer in the unaffected breast. But does this approach—called bilateral, or double, mastectomy—really improve the odds of survival? A new NIH-funded study indicates that, for the vast majority of women, it does not [1].

A research team led by Allison Kurian, an oncologist at Stanford University School of Medicine, and Scarlett Gomez, an epidemiologist at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California in Fremont, used the California Cancer Registry to study the 10-year survival outcomes of patients diagnosed with early-stage cancer (stages 0–III) in one breast, between 1998 and 2011.


New Take On How Gastric Bypass Cures Diabetes

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PET CT images of rats

Caption: This is a PET/CT scan of a rat before (left) and after (right) gastric bypass surgery. This kind of a PET scan shows that after surgery the intestine (the looping structures) are using more glucose, which appear yellow and orange. By comparison the before surgery snapshot (left) reveals that there is very little glucose uptake in the intestines, which are barely visible.
Credit: Courtesy of the Stylopoulos Laboratory

A dramatic, lasting, weight loss treatment for morbidly obese patients is gastric bypass surgery. Although there are many variations of this surgery, each with its signature metabolic pros and cons, the Roux-en-Y bypass is the most popular. The operation involves reducing the stomach size by 90% (which restricts food intake) and reconnecting the remaining stomach pouch to a latter section of the small intestine called the jejunum. Food thus “bypasses” digestion in the stomach and the upper portion of the small intestine. The result of this gastrointestinal re-engineering is that less food is eaten and fewer calories are absorbed in the gut.