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Say Yes! COVID Test

Learning to Protect Communities with COVID-19 Home Testing Programs

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Credit: Say Yes! COVID Test

With most kids now back in school, parents face a new everyday concern: determining whether their child’s latest cough or sneeze might be a sign of COVID-19. If so, parents will want to keep their child at home to protect other students and staff, while also preventing the spread of the virus in their communities. And if it’s the parent who has a new cough, they also will want to know if the reason is COVID-19 before going to work or the store.

Home tests are now coming online to help concerned people make the right choice quickly. As more COVID-19 home tests enter the U.S. marketplace, research continues to help optimize their use. That’s why NIH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are teaming up in several parts of the country to provide residents age 2 and older with free home-testing kits for COVID-19. These reliable, nasal swab tests provide yes-or-no answers in about 15 minutes for parents and anyone else concerned about their possible exposure to the novel coronavirus.

The tests are part of an initiative called Say Yes! COVID Test (SYCT) that’s evaluating how best to implement home-testing programs within range of American communities, both urban and rural. The lessons learned are providing needed science-based data to help guide public health officials who are interested in implementing similar home-testing programs in communities throughout their states.

After successful eight-week pilot programs this past spring and summer in parts of North Carolina, Tennessee, and Michigan, SYCT is partnering this fall with four new communities. They are Fulton County, GA; Honolulu County, HI; Louisville Metro, KY; and Marion County, IN.

The Georgia and Hawaii partnerships, launched on September 20, are already off to a flying start. In Fulton County, home to Atlanta and several small cities, 21,673 direct-to-consumer orders (173,384 tests) have already been received. In Honolulu County, demand for the tests has exceeded all expectations, with 91,000 orders received in the first week (728,000 tests). The online ordering has now closed in Hawaii, and the remaining tests will be distributed on the ground through the local public health department.

SYCT offers the Quidel QuickVue® At-Home COVID-19 test, which is supplied through the NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative. The antigen test uses a self-collected nasal swab sample that is placed in a test tube containing solution, followed by a test strip. Colored lines that appear on the test strip indicate a positive or negative result—similar to a pregnancy test.

The program allows residents in participating counties to order free home tests online or for in-person pick up at designated sites in their community. Each resident can ask for eight rapid tests, which equals two weekly tests over four weeks. An easy-to-navigate website like this one and a digital app, developed by initiative partner CareEvolution, are available for residents to order their tests, sign-up for testing reminders, and allow voluntary test result reporting to the public health department.

SYCT will generate data to answer several important questions about self or home-testing. They include questions about consumer demand, ensuring full community access, testing behavior, willingness to report test results, and, above all, effectiveness in controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19

Researchers at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; Duke University, Durham, NC; and the UMass Chan Medical School, Worcester, MA, will help crunch the data and look for guiding themes. They will also conduct a study pre- and post-intervention to evaluate levels of SARS-CoV-2 in the community, including using measures of virus in wastewater. In addition, researchers will compare their results to other counties similar in size and infection rates, but that are not participating in a free testing initiative.

The NIH and CDC are exploring ways to scale a SYCT-like program nationally to communities experiencing surges in COVID-19. The Biden Administration also recently invoked the Defense Production Act to purchase millions of COVID-19 home tests to help accelerate their availability and offer them at a lower cost to more Americans. That encompasses many different types of people, including concerned parents who need a quick-and-accurate answer on whether their children’s cough or sneeze is COVID-19.

Links:

COVID-19 Research (NIH)

Say Yes! COVID Test

Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) (NIH)

NIH Support: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities


New Initiative Puts At-Home Testing to Work in the Fight Against COVID-19

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COVID-19 Update: Community At-Home Testing
Credit: nito/Shutterstock

Thankfully COVID-19 testing is now more widely available than it was earlier in the pandemic. But getting tested often still involves going to a doctor’s office or community testing site and waiting as long as a couple of days for the results. Testing would be so much easier if people could do it themselves at home. If the result came up positive, a person could immediately self-isolate, helping to stop the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, from spreading any further in their communities.

That’s why I’m happy to report that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in close collaboration with state and local public health departments and with NIH, has begun an innovative community health initiative called “Say Yes! COVID Test.” The initiative, the first large-scale evaluation of community-wide, self-administered COVID-19 testing, was launched last week in Pitt County, NC, and will start soon in Chattanooga/Hamilton County, TN.

The initiative will provide as many as 160,000 residents in these two locales with free access to rapid COVID-19 home tests, supplied through NIH’s Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative. Participants can administer these easy-to-use tests themselves up to three times a week for one month. The goal is to assess the benefits of self-administered COVID-19 testing and help guide other communities in implementing similar future programs to slow the spread of COVID-19.

The counties in North Carolina and Tennessee were selected based on several criteria. These included local infection rates; public availability of accurate COVID-19 tracking data, such as that gathered by wastewater surveillance; the presence of local infrastructure needed to support the project; and existing community relationships through RADx’s Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program. Taken together, these criteria also help to ensure that vulnerable and underserved populations will benefit from the initiative.

The test is called the QuickVue At-Home COVID-19 Test. Developed with RADx support by San Diego-based diagnostic company Quidel, this test is easily performed with a nasal swab and offers results in just 10 minutes. Last week, the test was among several authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for over-the-counter use to screen for COVID-19 at home.

Participants can order their QuickVue test kits online for home delivery or local pick up. A free online tool, which was developed with NIH support by CareEvolution, LLC, Ann Arbor, MI, will also be available to provide testing instructions, help in understanding test results, and text message reminders about testing. This innovative tool is also available as a smartphone app.

A recent study, supported by the RADx initiative, found that rapid antigen testing for COVID-19, when conducted at least three times per week, achieves a viral detection level on par with the gold standard of PCR-based COVID-19 testing processed in a lab [1]. That’s especially significant considering the other advantages of a low-cost, self-administered rapid test, including confidential results at home in minutes.

The Say Yes! COVID Test initiative is an important next step in informing the best testing strategies in communities all over the country to end this and future pandemics. The initiative will also help to determine how readily people accept such testing when it’s made available to them. If the foundational data looks promising, the hope is that rapid at-home tests will help to encourage people to protect themselves and others by following the three W’s (Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Watch your distance), getting vaccinated, and saying “Yes” to the COVID-19 test.

Reference:

[1] Longitudinal assessment of diagnostic test performance over the course of acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. Smith RL, Gibson LL, Martinez PP, Heetderks WJ, McManus DD, Brooke CB, et al. medRxiv, 2021 March 20.

Links:

CDC and NIH bring COVID-19 self-testing to residents in two locales, NIH News Release, March 31, 2021

Say Yes! COVID Test

Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) (NIH)

COVID-19 Testing (CDC)

Quidel Corporation (San Diego, CA)

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Continues to Advance Over-the Counter and Other Screening Test Development, FDA News Release, March 31, 2021

NIH Support: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering