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PARK2

siRNAs: Small Molecules that Pack a Big Punch

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Photo of parkin protein (green) that tags damaged mitochondria (red)

Caption: NIH scientists used RNA interference to find genes that interact with the parkin protein (green), which tags damaged mitochondria (red). Mutations in the parkin gene are linked to Parkinson’s disease and other mitochondrial disorders.
Credit: Richard J. Youle Laboratory, NINDS, NIH

It would be terrific if we could turn off human genes in the laboratory, one at a time, to figure out their exact functions and learn more about how our health is affected when those functions are disrupted. Today, I’m excited to announce the availability of new data that will empower researchers to do just that on a genome-wide scale. As part of a public-private collaboration between the NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and Life Technologies Corporation, researchers now have access to a wealth of information about small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are snippets of ribonucleic acid (RNA) with the power to turn off a gene, or reduce its activity—in much the same way that we use a dimmer switch to modulate a light.