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neuroanatomy

The Amazing Brain: Mapping Brain Circuits in Vivid Color

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Hop aboard as we fly up, down, left, and right through the information highways of the human brain! This captivating and eye-catching video was one of the winners of the 2019 “Show us Your Brain!” contest sponsored by the NIH-led Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies® (BRAIN) Initiative.

The video travels through several portions of the brain’s white matter—bundles of fiber that carry nerve signals between the brain and the body, as well as within the brain itself. Fiber colors indicate directionality: left-right fibers (red), front-back fibers (green), and top-bottom fibers (blue).

Looking from the back, we start our journey deep within the brain in the limbic system, the area that helps control emotion, learning, and memory. About three seconds in, visual fibers pop into view extending from the eyes to various brain areas into the occipital lobe (one of four major brain lobes) in the back of the brain.

About two seconds later, flying over top as the brain starts rotating, we see various fiber bundles spray upward throughout the cerebral cortex, communicating information related to language processing, short-term memory, and other functions. About halfway through the video, several green bundles emerge arching across the brain’s midline. These bundles, called the corpus callosum, house the fibers enabling communication between left and right sides of the brain. Finally, the video closes as we see many different fiber bundles lighting up all over, enabling communication between different cortical and subcortical portions of the brain through association and projection pathways.

Dynamic maps like these are created using a 3D imaging technique called diffusion MRI tractography [1]. The technique tracks subtle pathways of water movement in the brain, and allows researchers to model the physical properties (connectional anatomy) that underlie the brain’s electrical properties (neuronal signaling). Postdoctoral researcher Ryan Cabeen and Arthur Toga, director of the University of Southern California Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Los Angeles, used the method to study how white matter changes in developing and aging brains, as well as in brains affected by neurodegenerative or neurological disorders.

Scientific animator Jim Stanis produced the video with Cabeen and Toga. The team first created a population-averaged brain using high-quality diffusion MRI datasets from the Human Connectome Project ,and then used sophisticated computational tools to delineate each bundle manually .

The tractography technique lets scientists visualize and quantitatively analyze the brain’s wiring patterns, complementing our understanding of how the brain functions. Such methods are especially useful to learn about the organization of deep-brain areas that remain out of reach for scientists using current tools and imaging techniques.

Reference:

[1] Kernel regression estimation of fiber orientation mixtures in diffusion MRI. Cabeen RP, Bastin ME, Laidlaw DH. Neuroimage. 2016 Feb 15;127:158-172.

Links:

Arthur Toga (USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Los Angeles)

Ryan Cabeen (USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute)

qitwiki—Information about the Quantitative Imaging Toolkit (USC)

Human Connectome Project (USC)

Show Us Your Brain Contest! (BRAIN Initiative/NIH)

Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies® (BRAIN) Initiative (NIH)

NIH Support: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; National Institute of Mental Health