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National Eye Institute

New Director for NEI

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Michael Chiang Swearing In
At a virtual ceremony on Nov. 16, 2020, Michael F. Chiang was sworn in as the new director of the National Eye Institute (NEI). We are excited to welcome Michael to our NIH leadership.


A Cardboard Memory

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You’re right, that’s not really me. Neither is it Santa Tumminia, acting director of NIH’s National Eye Institute, shown in the red jacket making the shape of a heart with her fingers. You’re looking at cardboard cutouts of us at an on-campus event on October 24 for the 2019 NIH Combined Federal Campaign (CFC). So, who says you can’t be in two places at once! Credit: NIH

Singing A Fun Farewell Song

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Earlier in the month, I posted a photo taken during the retirement ceremony of Paul Sieving, director of the NIH’s National Eye Institute. I’ve since discovered this video recording of the song that I played for Paul during the ceremony. It’s the popular 1970s song, “I Can See Clearly Now” with special lyrics to mark the occasion. Credit: National Eye Institute

Best Wishes to Paul Sieving

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Sieving Farewell Ceremony
Best wishes to my friend Paul Sieving (left) upon his retirement as director of NIH’s National Eye Institute (NEI), On September 5, 2019, I joined the NIH family at a special ceremony to thank Paul for his nearly 20 years of leadership and scientific achievement at NEI. Afterwards, we posed for this photograph and to talk about old times. Paul and I were colleagues at the University of Michigan 30 years ago. In the next chapter of his research career, Paul will join the faculty at the University of California, Davis, where he will establish its Center for Ocular Regenerative Therapy. All the very best, Paul! Credit: NIH

Lighting up the Eyes

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microscopic image of a network of blood vessels

Image created using a nuclear label of a flat-mount preparation of the hyaloid vessels from the eye.
Source: Richard Lang, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, OH

This image may conjure up thoughts of bioluminescent jellyfish, but it actually shows a network of developing blood vessels in the eye of a three day old mouse. A study in Nature last week determined that light regulates the pattern of mouse blood vessels as they develop. Observing the intermediate states of eye development is important because abnormal blood vessel development is a major cause of blindness in premature infants.

Funded by National Eye Institute, NIH.


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