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LRRK2

New Insight into Parkinson’s Disease

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Photos of a healthy brain cell and a brain cell affected by Parkinson's

Caption: (LEFT) A healthy neuron with the alpha-synuclein (green) protein diffusely spread in the cell. The bright reddish dots are the garbage disposal lysosomes with alpha-synuclein entering, which gives them an orange hue. (RIGHT) This is a sick neuron from a LRRK2 brain. The lysosomes are enlarged and puffy because the alpha-synuclein is stuck outside and unable to enter the trash.
Credit: Samantha Orenstein and Dr. Esperanza Arias, Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York

I’m blogging today to tell you about a new NIH funded report [1] describing a possible cause of Parkinson’s disease: a clog in the protein disposal system.

You probably already know something about Parkinson’s disease. Many of us know individuals who have been stricken, and actor Michael J. Fox, who suffers from it, has done a great job talking about and spreading awareness of it. Parkinson’s is a progressive neurodegenerative condition in which the dopamine-producing cells in the brain region called the substantia nigra begin to sicken and die. These cells are critical for controlling movement; their death causes shaking, difficulty moving, and the characteristic slow gait. Patients can have trouble swallowing, chewing, and speaking. As the disease progresses, cognitive and behavioral problems take hold—depression, personality shifts, sleep disturbances.