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kidney cancer

Standing With a Remarkable Young Man

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Francis Collins and Andrew Lee

It was a pleasure to participate in presenting Andrew Lee with the Charles A. Sanders, M.D., Partnership Award at the annual fall board dinner of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH). The dinner was held on October 24 in Bethesda, MD. The 22-year-old Lee uses his passion for cars to travel the country to raise awareness and funds for rare kidney cancer research in children and young adults. In just over two years, Lee has turned his Driven to Cure, Inc. into an active grassroots movement that has made generous donations to help advance cutting-edge kidney cancer research conducted by the National Cancer Institute at the NIH Clinical Center. The Charles A. Sanders, M.D., Partnership Award is named for the former chairman of the FNIH Board of Directors. Credit: FNIH


All of Us: Eric Dishman’s Story

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At age 19, Eric Dishman was diagnosed with a rare form of kidney cancer. The prognosis: nine months to live. Thanks to early access to pioneering research in precision medicine, which clarified the best treatment plan for him, Eric is alive and well almost 25 years later. As you’ll learn in this video, Eric now directs NIH’s All of Us Research Program, which is enrolling 1 million or more Americans to build the foundation for the future of precision medicine.

If you’d like to volunteer for this landmark effort, go to the All of Us website, click the “Join Now” button, and follow the three easy steps. First, create an account. It’s free and takes just a minute or two. Next, complete the enrollment and consent forms. That usually takes 30 minutes or less. Then, complete some baseline surveys and find out what to do next. Thank you!


Different Cancers Can Share Genetic Signatures

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Cancer types floating over a cell with unraveling DNA

NIH-funded researchers analyzed the DNA of these cancers.

Cancer is a disease of the genome. It arises when genes involved in promoting or suppressing cell growth sustain mutations that disturb the normal stop and go signals.  There are more than 100 different types of cancer, most of which derive their names and current treatment based on their tissue of origin—breast, colon, or brain, for example. But because of advances in DNA sequencing and analysis, that soon may be about to change.

Using data generated through The Cancer Genome Atlas, NIH-funded researchers recently compared the genomic fingerprints of tumor samples from nearly 3,300 patients with 12 types of cancer: acute myeloid leukemia, bladder, brain (glioblastoma multiforme), breast, colon, endometrial, head and neck, kidney, lung (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma), ovarian, and rectal. Confirming but greatly extending what smaller studies have shown, the researchers discovered that even when cancers originate from vastly different tissues, they can show similar features at the DNA level


New Understanding of a Common Kidney Cancer

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Purple stained kidney tissue

Caption: Histologic image of clear cell kidney cancer
Slide courtesy of W. Marston Linehan, National Cancer Institute, NIH

Understanding how cancer cells shift into high gear—what makes them become more aggressive and unresponsive to treatment—is a key concern of cancer researchers. A new study reveals how this escalation occurs in the most common form of kidney cancer: clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The study shows that ccRCC tumors acquire specific mutations that encourage uncontrollable growth and shifts in energy use and production [1].

Conducted by researchers in the NIH-led The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network, the study compared more than 400 ccRCC tumors from individual patients with healthy tissue samples from the same patients. Researchers were looking for differences in the gene activity and proteins in healthy vs. tumor tissue.