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The Amazing Brain: Capturing Neurons in Action

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Credit: Andreas Tolias, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston

With today’s powerful imaging tools, neuroscientists can monitor the firing and function of many distinct neurons in our brains, even while we move freely about. They also possess another set of tools to capture remarkable, high-resolution images of the brain’s many thousands of individual neurons, tracing the form of each intricate branch of their tree-like structures.

Most brain imaging approaches don’t capture neural form and function at once. Yet that’s precisely what you’re seeing in this knockout of a movie, another winner in the Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo and Video Contest, supported by NIH’s Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies® (BRAIN) Initiative.

This first-of-its kind look into the mammalian brain produced by Andreas Tolias, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, and colleagues features about 200 neurons in the visual cortex, which receives and processes visual information. First, you see a colorful, tightly packed network of neurons. Then, those neurons, which were colorized by the researchers in vibrant pinks, reds, blues, and greens, pull apart to reveal their finely detailed patterns and shapes. Throughout the video, you can see neural activity, which appears as flashes of white that resemble lightning bolts.

Making this movie was a multi-step process. First, the Tolias group presented laboratory mice with a series of visual cues, using a functional imaging approach called two-photon calcium imaging to record the electrical activity of individual neurons. While this technique allowed the researchers to pinpoint the precise locations and activity of each individual neuron in the visual cortex, they couldn’t zoom in to see their precise structures.

So, the Baylor team sent the mice to colleagues Nuno da Costa and Clay Reid, Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, who had the needed electron microscopes and technical expertise to zoom in on these structures. Their data allowed collaborator Sebastian Seung’s team, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, to trace individual neurons in the visual cortex along their circuitous paths. Finally, they used sophisticated machine learning algorithms to carefully align the two imaging datasets and produce this amazing movie.

This research was supported by Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), part of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. The IARPA is one of NIH’s governmental collaborators in the BRAIN Initiative.

Tolias and team already are making use of their imaging data to learn more about the precise ways in which individual neurons and groups of neurons in the mouse visual cortex integrate visual inputs to produce a coherent view of the animals’ surroundings. They’ve also collected an even-larger data set, scaling their approach up to tens of thousands of neurons. Those data are now freely available to other neuroscientists to help advance their work. As researchers make use of these and similar data, this union of neural form and function will surely yield new high-resolution discoveries about the mammalian brain.

Links:

Tolias Lab (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston)

Nuno da Costa (Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle)

R. Clay Reid (Allen Institute)

H. Sebastian Seung (Princeton University, Princeton, NJ)

Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks (MICrONS) Explorer

Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies® (BRAIN) Initiative (NIH)

Show Us Your BRAINs Photo & Video Contest (BRAIN Initiative)

NIH Support: BRAIN Initiative; Common Fund