Skip to main content

animal models

Ferreting Out Genomic Secrets

Posted on by

Ferret

Ferret in a Colorado conservation center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Not only is the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) adept at navigating a dirt field or threading electrical cables through piping (in New Zealand, ferrets can be registered as electrician assistants), this furry 5-pounder ranks as a real heavyweight for studying respiratory diseases. In fact, much of our current thinking about influenza is influenced by research with ferrets.

Now, the ferret will stand out even more. As reported online in Nature Biotechnology, NIH-funded researchers recently sequenced the genome of the sable ferret, the type that is bred in the United States as a pet. By studying this genetic blueprint like an explorer would a map, scientists can perform experiments to learn more systematically how the ferret copes biologically with common or emerging respiratory pathogens, pointing the way to improved strategies to preserve the health and well being of humans and ferrets alike.


Drug Discovery from A to Z … Arrhythmias to Zebrafish!

Posted on by

Healthy and mutated zebrafish

Caption: Healthy zebrafish (top) compared to zebrafish with arrhythmia-causing mutation (bottom). Their hearts are shown to the right, with enlargement indicating a weaker heart. The heart’s outflow tract is marked OFT; atrium, a; and ventricle, v.
Credit: Asimaki et al. Science Translational Medicine

Arrhythmia is a condition in which the heart loses its regular rhythm, beating either too rapidly or too slowly. Occasional irregular heartbeats are harmless, but if sustained they can cause dizziness, fainting, and even sudden death. There are a number of drugs available that can prevent arrhythmias, but none are perfect. Implanted devices can help—pacemakers can keep the heart from beating too slowly, and defibrillators can reset the heart’s rhythm with an electrical shock if a dangerously rapid rhythm develops.

But new treatments are needed. Now, an NIH-funded research team has created an animal model that is advancing efforts to find new drugs to prevent arrhythmia.  Led by Jeffrey Saffitz at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, researchers used genetic engineering techniques to produce zebrafish with genetic mutations identical to those in some people who suffer from a rare inherited disease called arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). In humans, ACM leads to dangerous arrhythmias that can cause sudden cardiac death, usually in people under the age of 35.


Of Mice, Men, and Medicine

Posted on by

Photo of someone holding the lab on a chip device next to a photo of two laboratory mice

Will a chip challenge the mouse?
Source: Wyss Institute and Bill Branson, NIH

The humble laboratory mouse has taught us a phenomenal amount about embryonic development, disease, and evolution. And, for decades, the pharmaceutical industry has relied on these critters to test the safety and efficacy of new drug candidates. If it works in mice, so we thought, it should work in humans. But when it comes to molecules designed to target a sepsis-like condition, 150 drugs that successfully treated this condition in mice later failed in human clinical trials—a heartbreaking loss of decades of research and billions of dollars. A new NIH-funded study [1] reveals why.


Previous Page