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Dr. Francis Collins

Meeting with Congressman Ro Khanna

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Larry Tabak, Congressman Ro Khanna and Francis Collins at the NIH Clinical Center

We had a great visit with Congressman Ro Khanna (center) of California. Our discussion included recent advances in neuroscience, genomics, Big Data, and research on food allergies. NIH Deputy Director Larry Tabak (left) and I welcomed Congressman Khanna to the NIH Clinical Center on July 30, 2018.


Senator Udall Visits NIH

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Dr. Francis Collins, Senator Tom Udall and Dr. Larry Tabak

It was truly a pleasure speaking with Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico about microbiome research and its potential to improve human health during his visit to NIH. Here, I’m standing with Senator Udall (center) and NIH Deputy Director Larry Tabak (right). The visit took place on July 30, 2018. Credit: NIH


People Read Facial Expressions Differently

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Credit: Lydia Polimeni, NIH

What do you see in the faces above? We constantly make assumptions about what others are feeling based on their facial expressions, such as smiling or frowning. Many have even suggested that human facial expressions represent a universal language. But an NIH-funded research team recently uncovered evidence that different people may read common facial expressions in surprisingly different ways.

In a study published in Nature Human Behaviour, the researchers found that each individual’s past experience, beliefs, and conceptual knowledge of emotions will color how he or she interprets facial expressions [1]. These findings are not only fascinating, they might lead to new ways to help people who sometimes struggle with reading social cues, including those with anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or autism spectrum disorder.


Testifying on 21st Century Cures Act

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Francis Collins Testifying Before Congress

It was a great honor to appear before the U. S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Health. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and I provided the subcommittee with a progress report on the implementation of the 21st Century Cures Act. The hearing was held on July 25, 2018. Credit: House Committee on Energy and Commerce


Building a Smarter Bandage

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Smart Bandage

Credit: Tufts University, Medford, MA

Smartphones, smartwatches, and smart electrocardiograms. How about a smart bandage?

This image features a prototype of a smart bandage equipped with temperature and pH sensors (lower right) printed directly onto the surface of a thin, flexible medical tape. You also see the “brains” of the operation: a microprocessor (upper left). When the sensors prompt the microprocessor, it heats up a hydrogel heating element in the bandage, releasing drugs and/or other healing substances on demand. It can also wirelessly transmit messages directly to a smartphone to keep patients and doctors updated.

While the smart bandage might help mend everyday cuts and scrapes, it was designed with the intent of helping people with hard-to-heal chronic wounds, such as leg and foot ulcers. Chronic wounds affect millions of Americans, including many seniors [1]. Such wounds are often treated at home and, if managed incorrectly, can lead to infections and potentially serious health problems.


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