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Oral Insulin Delivery: Can the Tortoise Win the Race?

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Turtle shape compared to capsule shape
Caption: The African leopard tortoise’s shape inspired a new insulin-injecting “pill” (right). Credit: Alex Abramson

People with diabetes often must inject insulin multiple times a day to keep their blood glucose levels under control. So, I was intrigued to learn that NIH-funded bioengineers have designed a new kind of “pill” that may someday reduce the need for those uncomfortable shots. The inspiration for their design? A tortoise!

The new “pill”—actually, a swallowable device containing a tiny injection system—is shaped like the shell of an African leopard tortoise. In much the same way that the animal’s highly curved shell enables it to quickly right itself when flipped on its back, the shape of the new device is intended to help it land in the right position to inject insulin or other medicines into the stomach wall.

The hunt for a means to deliver insulin in pill form has been on ever since insulin injections first were introduced, nearly a century ago. The challenge in oral delivery of insulin and other “biologic” drugs—including therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids—is how to get these large biomolecules through the highly acidic stomach and duodenum, where multiple powerful digestive enzymes reside, and into the bloodstream unscathed. Past efforts to address this challenge have met with only limited success.

In a study published in the journal Science, a team, led by Robert Langer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Giovanni Traverso, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, took a new approach to the problem by developing a tiny, ingestible injection system [1]. They call their pea-sized device SOMA, short for “self-orienting millimeter-scale applicator.”

In designing SOMA, the researchers knew they had to come up with a design that would orient the injection apparatus correctly. So they looked to the African leopard tortoise. They knew that, much like a child’s “weeble-wobble” toy, this tortoise can easily right its body if tipped over due to its low center of gravity and highly curved shell. With the shape of the tortoise shell as a starting point, the researchers used computer modeling to perfect their design. The final result features a partially hollowed-out, polymer-and-steel capsule that houses a tiny, spring-loaded needle tipped with compressed, freeze-dried insulin. There is also a dissolvable sugar disk to hold the needle in place until the time is right.

Here’s how it works: once a SOMA is swallowed and reaches the stomach, it quickly orients itself in a way that its needle-side rests against the stomach wall. After the protective sugar disk dissolves in stomach acid, the spring-loaded needle tipped with insulin is released, injecting its load of insulin into the stomach wall, from which it enters the bloodstream. Meanwhile, the spent SOMA device passes on through the digestive system.

The researchers’ tests in pigs have shown that a single SOMA can successfully deliver insulin doses of up to 3 milligrams, comparable to the amount a human with diabetes might need to inject. The tests also showed that the device’s microinjection did not damage the animals’ stomach tissue or the muscles surrounding the stomach. Because the stomach is known for being insensitive to pain, researchers expect that people receiving insulin via SOMA wouldn’t feel a thing, but much more research is needed to confirm both the safety and efficacy of the new device for human use.

Meanwhile, this fascinating work serves as a reminder that when it comes to biomedical science, inspiration sometimes can come from the most unexpected places.

Reference:

[1] An ingestible self-orienting system for oral delivery of macromolecules. Abramson A, Caffarel-Salvador E, Khang M, Dellal D, Silverstein D, Gao Y, Frederiksen MR, Vegge A, Hubálek F, Water JJ, Friderichsen AV, Fels J, Kirk RK, Cleveland C, Collins J, Tamang S, Hayward A, Landh T, Buckley ST, Roxhed N, Rahbek U, Langer R, Traverso G. Science. 2019 Feb 8;363(6427):611-615.

Links:

Diabetes (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH)

Langer Lab (MIT, Cambridge)

Giovanni Traverso (Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston)

NIH Support: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

8 Comments

  • Liza Brazelton says:

    There is no indication that the SOMAs are biodegradable. It would be creating another problem if there are millions of SOMAS ending up in the ocean as microplastics adding to the already increasing environmental problem.

    • Martin E. Tabnik, Ph.D. says:

      ? Diabetic needles and insulin containers are?

      • Liza Brazelton says:

        They are not but we should be moving to something that is. Not solve one problem and create another. Could the SOMAS be a port that one that can deliver multiple doses before it is spend and then it biodegrades? Leave not trace- that should be the culture going forward…

    • KMichels says:

      Agreed! Innovative, assuming it can make it to its target. Bad as plasitics used to inject are- unlike plastic for injection it presumably heads straight into our sewer systems after doing its job. No way to reclaim it. Needs to be biodegradable

  • Kenny says:

    This type of oral insulin sounds very risky to say the least.

  • Martin E. Tabnik, Ph.D. says:

    Whatever happened to Afrezza?

  • K C Tiwari says:

    The said pill ( device ) will provide instant release of total quantity of insulin in the wall of stomach or it will be released slowly in order to maintain the glucose level as expected

  • Ali says:

    SOMA is ok but it doesn’t work for many people suffer from GERD because it does not reach the stomach and insulin is released into the esophagus wall.

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